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More classes are being made available to UTPA students
By Office of University Relations
956-665-2741
Posted: 06/02/2011
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To meet the growing demand from students, The University of Texas-Pan American has been adding more sections to core classes for undergraduates, as well as providing more courses for students at all levels to take during the Fall 2011 semester.

The University's Office of the Registrar keeps a daily record of how many students register for classes for each semester compared to the same day a year ago. For the past month, the University has seen an increase in enrollment for the Fall semester of about 5 percent.

And with more orientations scheduled throughout the summer, student enrollment is expected to continue to increase, said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Havidán Rodríguez.

Subjects that had the highest demand for more courses were art, biology, chemistry and history, Rodríguez said. The University was able to secure $2.6 million for all seven colleges to pay for lecturers to teach courses that are in high demand, Rodríguez said.

Rodríguez said he meets weekly with the vice provosts in charge of undergraduate and graduate studies, as well as the associate vice president and dean of admissions and student enrollment to review student enrollment reports and determine which classes need more or fewer sections based on those enrollment numbers.

Rodríguez said he also meets with college deans to discuss what classes are needed based on student demand.

There also have been some cases where deans have approached him about adding courses because of high student demand, he said.

"Every time an issue trickles up we're addressing these issues," he said.

Rodríguez said he encourages students to stay in contact with their advisers and department chairs, as well as log into ASSIST to stay up to date with course offerings.

"We're here because of the students, we're here to serve the students, we're here to provide the courses that students need," he said.