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UTPA TRIO program receives $1.6 million grant
By Julie Dolores Villarreal, Informational Writer
316-7669
Posted: 05/30/2001
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A TRIO program at The University of Texas-Pan American will continue providing services for students after receiving $1.6 million from the U.S. Department of Education.

UTPA was among three educational institutions - South Texas Community College and Edcouch-Elsa High School - honored by U.S. Rep. Rubén Hinojosa (D-Mercedes) at a news conference Tuesday, May 29.

“The grant is one of our funding sources. We are very excited about receiving it,” said Richard Trevino, Learning Assistance Center interim director. “There is no question that we would not be able to continue with our program if it wasn’t for this grant.”


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The University of Texas-Pan American was recently awarded $1.6 million in a TRIO grant for higher education programs through Congressman Ruben Hinojosa. From left are Jaime Miranda, Upward Bound counselor; Sofia Pina, Upward Bound associate director; Mary Alice Reyes, GEAR UP interim director; Sofia Delangel, Educational Talent Search director; Felipe Salinas, Special Programs director; Jorge L. Teniente, GEAR UP administrative coordinator; and Richard Trevino, Learning Assistance Center interim director.

UTPA TRIO programs, which include Upward Bound, Educational Talent Search and Student Support Services, provide outreach and support to disadvantaged students from middle school to college. Students participate in local events that enrich their minds for the future.

The most recent grant will provide funding for the Student Support Services through 2005.

Hinojosa said the level of funding proves UTPA is a strong educational tool providing assistance to local students and the community.

“This grant supports the fact that UTPA remains a leader in education,” Hinojosa said. “I feel good about what is happening in education. It’s exciting to be on this educational front.”

Student Support Services, which celebrated its 25th anniversary, helps low-income students stay in college until they earn their degrees. Participants receive tutoring, counseling and remedial instruction.

“We have seen a higher graduation rate from those students who have participated in our programs,” Trevino said. “This new grant will allow us to continue providing services for our students.”

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