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Rondel V. Davidson Lecture Series: Renowned historian to address NAFTA on March 7
Posted: 02/26/2013
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Noted historian Dr. Sterling Evans from the University of Oklahoma will headline the 2013 Rondel V. Davidson Lecture Series at The University of Texas-Pan American on Thursday, March 7, 7 p.m. at the Engineering Auditorium.

Dr. Sterling Evans, Louise Welsh Endowed Chair in Oklahoma, Southern Plains, and Borderlands History and director of graduate studies in the Department of History at the University of Oklahoma.

Evans' presentation, "Nothing New About NAFTA: North American Connections in Historical Perspective," will address a variety of different angles involved in North American commerce, industry, and agriculture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Mexico, the United States, and Canada. A question and answer session with Evans will follow the lecture. The event is sponsored by the Rondel V. Davidson Endowment and the UTPA History Program.

Evans currently holds the Louise Welsh Endowed Chair in Oklahoma, Southern Plains, and Borderlands History and is the director of graduate studies in the Department of History at the University of Oklahoma. His research interests include Modern Latin America, the American West, and environmental and agricultural history, especially how these fields connect through transnational analysis. He is the author of "The Green Republic: A Conservation History of Costa Rica" (Texas, 1999), "Bound in Twine: The History and Ecology of the Henequen-Wheat Complex for Mexico and the American and Canadian Plains, 1880-1950" (Texas A&M, 2007), and "Damming Sonora: Water, Agriculture, and Environmental Change in Northwest Mexico" (Arizona, forthcoming).

The annual Rondel V. Davidson lecture is funded by the Rondel V. Davidson Endowment, a fund supported by private donations given in memory of Davidson, late professor and chair of the UTPA Department of History and Philosophy, to spark interest in issues of history, identity, memory and cross-connections in the arts and humanities that arise from the study of the human past.

For more information, call the Department of History and Philosophy at (956) 665-3561.